DERMAL

Autologous adipose SVF cells for non-healing wounds

HEALING THE OUTSIDE FROM WITHIN

Non-healing wounds are treated where possible with reconstructive skin grafting and/or vascular reconstruction surgery.  As with any surgical intervention, these surgical interventions introduce potential risk, including loss of the graft, loss of sensation, and infection.  In severe instances, reconstructive surgery may not be a viable option, and amputation may be the only surgical option.

A cellular therapy approach is focused on ‘healing’ a wound rather than surgical repair.  The procedure uses a patient’s own stromal and vascular cells to promote a healing response and allow the body to heal itself. 

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Emerging research on cellular therapy shows that autologous adipose-derived cellular implants have the potential to treat wounds and a variety of other disease states. Further information on the treatment gap can be found in our white paper.



For more information on non-healing wounds, a study led by Dr. Michael Carstens of Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine called, “Treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers with adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell injections: Safety and evidence of efficacy at 1 year” can be found here

 

Our cell therapy is investigational. It is not approved by the FDA for sale or use in the US.

ADDRESSING COMPLEX NON-HEALING WOUNDS

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MINIMALLY INVASIVE

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SIGNIFICANT HUMAN CLINICAL DATA

Diabetic Foot Ulcers, Critical Limb Ischemia

This study involved critical size wounds – non-healing wounds that cannot be closed by any drug or surgical method. They were treated with a single treatment of SVF cellular therapy. All the subjects were amputation candidates. Of the 51 original subjects 48 achieved complete closure in 6 months (94%). There were no non-responders. No skin grafts or suture closures were used.

Head Fractal

DERMAL

Autologous cellular implants for dermal therapies

HEALING THE OUTSIDE FROM WITHIN

Non-healing wounds are treated where possible with reconstructive skin grafting and/or vascular reconstruction surgery.  As with any surgical intervention, these surgical interventions introduce potential risk, including loss of the graft, loss of sensation, and infection.  In severe instances, reconstructive surgery may not be a viable option, and amputation may be the only surgical option.

A cellular therapy approach is focused on ‘healing’ a wound rather than surgical repair.  The procedure uses a patient’s own stromal and vascular cells to promote a healing response and allow the body to heal itself. 

ADDRESSING COMPLEX NON-HEALING WOUNDS

Emerging research on cellular therapy shows that autologous adipose-derived cellular implants have the potential to treat wounds and a variety of other disease states. Further information on the treatment gap can be found in our white paper.



For more information on non-healing wounds, a study led by Dr. Michael Carstens of Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine called, “Treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers with adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell injections: Safety and evidence of efficacy at 1 year” can be found here

Circle with arrow clipart

MINIMALLY INVASIVE

World with tick clipart

SIGNIFICANT HUMAN CLINICAL DATA

Diabetic Foot Ulcers, Critical Limb Ischemia

This study involved critical size wounds – non-healing wounds that cannot be closed by any drug or surgical method. They were treated with a single treatment of SVF cellular therapy. All the subjects were amputation candidates. Of the 51 original subjects 48 achieved complete closure in 6 months (94%). There were no non-responders. No skin grafts or suture closures were used.